WAYS SMALL BUSINESSES BENEFIT THE LOCAL COMMUNITY

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Get Your Business Listed @ R250 per annum
Is Your Business Registered

At some point in time, you’ve likely seen a statistic or statement by a politician or economist stating the importance of small business to local communities.

 

While small businesses generate new jobs they’re also a valuable asset to the local community. Here are 10 ways that small businesses make a profound local impact:

 

1. Community Identity

Take a stroll down Main Street and you’ll likely notice that your community has its own unique character and charm. From the mom-and-pop shop, the local CPA and dog grooming business, to an antiques emporium, coffee shop, yoga studio and beyond, small businesses contribute to a community’s identity. Many municipalities and tourism boards have prioritized preserving the unique character a vibrant small business community creates– transforming that character into an advantage.

 

2. Community Involvement

Small business owners are an integral part of the communities in which they live and work. Thus, they tend to be cognizant of how their decisions may impact their neighbour. In addition, local small business entrepreneurs tend to be involved in the community. For instance, they may sponsor local Little League teams, donate to the city’s homeless shelter, join the chamber of commerce, participate in community charity events, or contribute to a local non-profit organization. It’s also not unheard of for successful business owners to guest lecture at the local community college, technical institute, or small business center.

 

3. Community Health

In addition to contributing to the local community’s unique identity and being involved locally, small business owners help to build a sense of community. Their businesses tend to be people businesses. Small business owners are more likely to build personal relationships with their customers, knowing many of them by name. When was the last time you walked into a large chain store and were greeted by name?

 

Many small business owners band together, forming casual or formal relationships, such as a merchant’s association or one-on-one counselling and mentoring relationships. These relationships leverage the expertise of the participants to contribute to the business community’s long-term success. They are also often a key tool for engendering goodwill between business owners, so that as foot traffic to one business increases, other nearby businesses benefit through increased exposure and word-of-mouth referrals.

 

4. Increasing the Tax Base

When local residents shop at small businesses within their communities, their tax dollars stay within the local economy, helping to improve their community as a result. Likewise, local small businesses tend to buy locally as well, pumping more of their profits back into the community than their chain store counterparts, helping with economic development.

 

5. Local Jobs

Small businesses are job creators, and most of those jobs are local jobs. Rather than having to commute to another city, employees work closer to home. Supporting local businesses also helps your fellow community members who work at them. When a community has a vibrant commercial center, it also creates ample opportunities for these workers to shop at other local small businesses. They grab lunch or dinner from local restaurants, run errands on their break, and grab drinks from local bars. This keeps money local and further creates a tight-knit community vibe.

 

6. Entrepreneurship

Small businesses are the product of the business owner’s entrepreneurial spirit. By starting a small business, the business owner is taking charge of his or her future. Entrepreneurship fuels our economic innovation and prosperity and serves as a key means for families to move out of low-wage jobs and into the middle class. Inspiring entrepreneurship and encourage continued small business development in the local community.

 

7. Diverse, Locally Made Products and Services

One-of-a-kind and locally made products can attract customers to a community, bolstering tourism and contributing to the local vibe. Locally made goods are also attractive to residents who want to minimize their carbon footprints, support local businesses, and keep their tax rands close to home.

 

 

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Get Your Business Listed @ R250 per annum
Is Your Business Registered
Suburbs Durban (Pty)Ltd, Durban, Sydenham, Sherwood, Sparks Eastate, Asherville, Springfield, Brickfield, Springtown

Suburbs Durban (Pty)Ltd, Durban, Sydenham, Sherwood, Sparks Eastate, Asherville, Springfield, Brickfield, Springtown

Suburbs Durban (Pty)Ltd, Durban, Sydenham, Sherwood, Sparks Eastate, Asherville, Springfield, Brickfield, Springtown